Hey y’all. I haven’t been posting on the bowl in a while. I’ve been on The Twitters because it’s easier to post a 140 character status than to write a thought out post about what’s been on my mind and what I’ve been doing the last few months. I miss you all though. I mean, I see some of you on The Twitters, but a lot of you guys have been holding it down on here.

Anyway, the purpose of my mini rant. Part of the reason for my hibernation is that I’ve been studying for the LSAT and applying to various law schools. I got a pretty decent score on the exam, and I’ve applied to 16 law schools so far. I’ve spent over $600 applying to said law schools. Over a half a grand just APPLYING to law schools. And the crazy thing is: that’s not even bad. For all but two of the schools I’ve applied to, I’ve gotten fee waivers (there is still a $30 processing fee to submit each app).

This does not include the 170 dollars I spent registering for the service to help me apply to these schools. Or the $100 plus dollars to take the LSAT to get into these schools. Thank god a) I have a job and b) I performed well enough on these tests to get merit fee waivers or else I wouldn’t be able to apply to probably most of these schools I actually ended up submitting an app to. Honestly, I have to credit b more so than a because even with my job I’m struggling to pay these fees.

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My point in writing this post is this: the expense to even apply to get into school (college, grad school) is ridiculous. Grad school obviously ain’t for us po folk, and if you can’t see it though how much I had to pay (and am still paying) to apply, see in how an NYU admissions rep acted to a student who respectfully inquired about fee waivers. This is an issue that needs to be fixed. If you’re going to give people fee waivers, waive everydamnthing. If you’re going to market education as something for all people, then make it something for ALL people. It breaks my heart to see someone who has the academic credentials to get into a school, but without the financial means, so they have to “settle” for another less academically prestigious institution. They work hard to get into the school that they want, only to be told no by a factor out of many peoples control especially at the ages of 18, 22, 25, etc. I understand that a student can ball out academically at a “lesser” school for a portion of the price (I’m using lesser in terms of how society views schools, because a lot of these lesser schools provide better educational experiences than the prestigious ones), but for a person to have to sacrifice because of the financial barriers these institutions put up is sad. A lot of students can’t even afford to apply. Many more can barely afford to apply (like myself).

Just another example of how education is only for the haves.