A Space for People of Color, By People of Color. Be Cool.
A Space for People of Color, By People of Color. Be Cool.
Illustration for article titled What Systemic Racism Looks like Dressed up in Judges’, Lawyers’,  City Council Robes -  Tribute In Memoriam to Its Opposite Peacemakers (RIP Carl Reiner)
Graphic: Color of Law

And these are just some of the examples from this morning and, say, the past two days … that were caught (on video, on the record)

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Attn: calling all librarians ^^

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Don’t really know what to say about this ^^. There is video on the internet but I found it sufficiently disturbing that I’m reluctant to post it again here.

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More racist violence

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Economic oppression

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And of course, as we’ve heard about before here

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there is one place this all leads: kakistocracy, where a small group of corrupt people in power is looting what are supposed to be public resources for the availability and betterment of all in order to try to steal everything in a battery of Treasury siphoning and price-gouging

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… which is the end-stage answer to the question “Why should I care about this?” if there hasn’t been a stop in one’s mind at “because I am someone who cares about everyone else”.

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Illustration for article titled What Systemic Racism Looks like Dressed up in Judges’, Lawyers’,  City Council Robes -  Tribute In Memoriam to Its Opposite Peacemakers (RIP Carl Reiner)
Graphic: Mapping Corruption

(This post’s lead image is from a book of that name by law professor Richard Rothstein - we’ve talked about it here and if you Google it, you’ll see there are ongoing university talks centered around it; all the myriad ways oppression and segregation are systematized and hence invisibilized - made to look normal to those who aren’t immediately adversely affected by it and so are so subsumed by their everyday responsibilities, not realizing others have additional barriers to meeting those responsibilities or are actively & deliberately kept from fulfilling them so that prevention of completion can serve as a basis for justifying further deprivation of marginalized people.)

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On Broadening One’s Reading List Once One Has Finished “White Fragility” - Don’t Just STOP There

Where I come down on the current discussion some of my more rigorous scholarly peers of color are having about white folks congratulating themselves on having worked through “White Fragility” - setting aside my own personal feelings about a white woman (and she’s not the only one; Deb Irving is another) making burgeoning bank off concepts BIPOC writers have been trying to promulgate literally for centuries - is that if you are actually serious about anti-racist work you can’t STOP there.

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Someone who’s been raised in a family where people prate things like “All Lives Matter” is not necessarily going to have the necessary historical/literary/sociological framework to understand the fullness of Baldwin Ellison or Claudia Rankine, or why redlining is bad, or even quite possibly the sentence “the United States’s wealth is based on slavery and genocide” or “there have already been ten holocausts on United States soil; eleven if you count the Native American genocide with the smallpox blankets”.

I recently heard a white anti-racist activist say that “when it comes to anti-racist work, white people are at the arithmetic level while Black people and other BIPOC have been doing calculus”.

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I’m not going to throw an arithmetic student into calculus, not leastwise because I’ve been (or at least resembled) that person. They won’t be motivated, and they won’t grasp the relevance of what they’re looking at; they’ll be more focused on their frustration because they’re confused.

(That’s a charitable read, granted - and I understand people who are in full “I’m not here to spoon-feed anybody” mode. Believe it.)

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Where I come down is that those 101 arithmetic students shouldn’t be permitted - nor should they want - to STAY arithmetic students. They should understand how that’s a reactionary position, and completely antithetical to progress.

I will find more of the book lists that have been recommended by those advanced scholars for people who have finished White Fragility and are (and should be) looking for more advanced work on this work to read. (I bookmarked several the first time I saw them, but of course now that I need them I can’t find them.)

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In Response To White People Asking “What Can We Do”?
Corinne Shutack Produces a “75 Things White People Can Do” List
At Which Point White People Immediately Chime In “I Can’t Do All That”

I got this list again just yesterday from a white friend (I’m on an email list of hers) about a month after I had distributed it out to people on a list of mine for the first time.

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In the service of service and common sense, let’s do a little math (since we already talked about arithmetic upthread). If you’re 38 and had started by doing 2 things on that list each year since you were 2, you’d be done already.

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If you didn’t start till you were 25 and did 3 things a year instead, you’d be done by the time you were 50.

The very first thing it seems (white) people have a tendency to say is “I can’t do all 75 things”. o.O

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It feels important to reiterate that nobody asked that any one person do all 75, and if even if they’re not highly motivated or ambitious not to try to accomplish all 75 at one time.

Just pick one. Just pick one each month. If 250 million people do that, it amplifies the “good works” exponentially and, as a UK author & activist I read this week succinctly puts it,

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a) sends the message to marginalized people that they are not alone, and

b) simultaneously sends the message to racist people that their lies will not be believed.

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Let’s continue to fight for the better world the genius who left us this week fought for right up until till he left us.

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In Memoriam

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